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Steve Sheinkin author visit: King George/ Wild West / Two Presidents

About these Books

KING GEORGE NEVER DID UNDERSTAND AMERICANS

Steve Sheinkin’s  King George: What Was His Problem?: Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution is full of utterly interesting, anecdotes, close-up narratives filled with little-known details, and lots of quotes that capture the spirit and voices and the actions of the principals. It's the story of the birth of our nation, complete with soldiers, spies, salmon sandwiches, and real facts you can't help but want to tell to everyone you know.

May 22, 1856: A MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM SOUTH CAROLINA WALKS INTO THE SENATE CHAMBER, LOOKING FOR TROUBLE.

That Congressman, Preston Brooks, was ready to attack Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts over remarks Sumner made slamming senators who supported slavery in Kansas. Brooks lifted his cane to beat Sumner, and here the action in the book stops, so that Steve Sheinkin in Two Miserable Presidents: Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the Civil War can explain just where this confrontation started. In the process, he unravels the complicated string of events – the small things, the personal ones, the big issues– that led to The Civil War. It is a time and a war that threatened America's very existence, revealed in the surprising true stories of the soldiers and statesmen who battled it out. 

 Read about the drama, discoveries and the dirty deeds that won the American West in Steve Sheinkin’s Which Way to the Wild West? Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn’t Tell You About Westward Expansion.

A chronological medley of anecdotes about the Wild West in nine lively chapters starting with the Louisiana Purchase and ending with the Lakota massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890. Casual vignettes of famous figures and ordinary people come to life in an almost irreverent way. A "What Ever Happened To…?" chapter follows up on notable individuals and lesser-known folks such as Biddy Mason (a former slave) and Catherine Sager (an orphaned pioneer child). The useful source notes include interesting suggestions for further reading on subjects such as territorial expansion, the gold rush, and Native Americans, and humorous black-and-white cartoons and caricatures decorate the pages.